A Deeper Look at OSHA’s Proposed GHS Revision 7 Update to the HazCom Standard

Download our new eBook to learn about OSHA's major proposed changes to the HazCom Standard, and how they might impact your business!


In February 2021, OSHA published a long-awaited notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to update its Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) to align with Revision 7 of the UN’s Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). Many company representatives have asked us for more information about the NPRM, and for good reason, since the proposed revisions would have far-reaching impact throughout the chemical supply chain. For example, chemical manufacturers would need to reclassify certain chemicals, reauthor safety data sheets (SDSs) for those chemicals, and develop new shipped container labels. End-users would have to evaluate whether they have chemicals affected by the HazCom changes in their workplace, manage a potential wave of updated SDSs and shipped labels and update their own HazCom practices accordingly.

Download our new eBook to get the information you’re looking for. You’ll get a close look at the most significant proposed changes, and learn what you most need to know to make sure your business and your people are well-prepared.

This eBook includes:

  • A discussion of proposed changes to classifications of several categories of hazardous chemicals and the industries most likely to be impacted by the changes
  • An explanation of proposed changes to labelling requirements for “small” and “very small” containers, proposed updates to hazard and precautionary statements, and proposed changes that would better align hazard communication requirements between the United States and Canada
  • An analysis of the next steps to expect in OSHA’s rulemaking, and the approximate timeline in which we can expect the changes to come into force

Download our new eBook to learn about OSHA's major proposed changes to the HazCom Standard, and how they might impact your business!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Deeper Look at OSHA’s Proposed GHS Revision 7 Update to the HazCom Standard

Download our new eBook to learn about OSHA's major proposed changes to the HazCom Standard, and how they might impact your business!


A Deeper Look at OSHA’s Proposed GHS Revision 7 Update to the HazCom Standard


In February 2021, OSHA published a long-awaited notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to update its Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) to align with Revision 7 of the UN’s Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). Many company representatives have asked us for more information about the NPRM, and for good reason, since the proposed revisions would have far-reaching impact throughout the chemical supply chain. For example, chemical manufacturers would need to reclassify certain chemicals, reauthor safety data sheets (SDSs) for those chemicals, and develop new shipped container labels. End-users would have to evaluate whether they have chemicals affected by the HazCom changes in their workplace, manage a potential wave of updated SDSs and shipped labels and update their own HazCom practices accordingly.

Download our new eBook to get the information you’re looking for. You’ll get a close look at the most significant proposed changes, and learn what you most need to know to make sure your business and your people are well-prepared.

This eBook includes:

  • A discussion of proposed changes to classifications of several categories of hazardous chemicals and the industries most likely to be impacted by the changes
  • An explanation of proposed changes to labelling requirements for “small” and “very small” containers, proposed updates to hazard and precautionary statements, and proposed changes that would better align hazard communication requirements between the United States and Canada
  • An analysis of the next steps to expect in OSHA’s rulemaking, and the approximate timeline in which we can expect the changes to come into force